Tag Archives: beets

Roses are Red and Your Dinner is Too

February 14th, 2014

The past few weeks people have been thinking about the big day – V day – the flowers, the chocolate, the expectations. Well, the day is here and what could be a better way than to celebrate it in true Urban Acres fashion, by cooking up some vegetables. So don’t let anybody fool you to think that the only way to enjoy this day is by buying flowers and eating chocolate. Those things can definitely brighten up someone’s life but how about using some of the produce from the Urban Acres co-op style bins to make this day memorable. Enjoy the enclosed recipe and celebrate your love of healthy living.

V-Day Mix 

Serving size depends on the amount of produce you use. Five handfuls of spinach is pictured.

 Step 1. Gather the ingredients.

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Step 2. Chop all your veggies.

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Step 3. Heat a couple of tablespoons of grape seed oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

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Step 4. Throw in the chopped up potato, kohlrabi, and beets. Stir for about 5 minutes and salt, salt, salt.

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Step 5. Throw in the celery and apples. Salt and stir for about 3 minutes.

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Step 6. Throw in the pine seeds. Keep stirring, you don’t want your seeds to burn.

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Step 7. Add the spinach and stir. .

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Step 8. The spinach will be wilted in a couple of minutes. 

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Step 9. Serve and enjoy.

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This dish will satisfy all of your senses: the glowing red color, the taste of sweet apples, the smell of roasted pine nuts, the warmth of the spinach, and the sound of humming agreement. The perfect celebration.

 

 

March 2nd Share

March 1st, 2013

To help you identify the items in the March 2nd co-op style produce shares
3.2.13 share

Need recipes?  Our recipes page has got ya covered.

Follow us on Instagram for more in-the-moment photos from the UA team.

February 22 + February 23 Share

February 22nd, 2013

To help you identify some of the items in this weekend’s co-op style produce shares

2.22.13 + 2.23.13 share

Follow us on Instagram for more in-the-moment photos from the UA team!

Get Healthy Co-op Style Day 15: Sweet Veggies Rock

January 23rd, 2013

get healthy coop style badge2On day 15 of Get Healthy Co-op Style, UA member and Health Coach Kim Wilson shares how veggies can satisfy your sweets cravings!

Please follow along, join us, blog, tweet and Facebook about it and be sure to use hashtag  #GetHealthyCoopStyle.

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Sweet Veggies Rock!

by Kim Wilson, Health Coach

Most of my clients crave sweets. I used to be a “sugar addict” myself, so I know firsthand how difficult it can be avoid sweet treats (they are everywhere)! Rather than depending on processed sugar to satisfy cravings, it’s a great idea to add naturally sweet foods to your daily diet to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Sweet vegetables soothe our internal organs and energize the mind. And because many of these vegetables are root vegetables, they are energetically grounding, which helps to balance out the “spaciness” people often feel after eating other kinds of sweet foods.

Sweet-Potato-940x626Examples of sweet vegetables include:

  • Corn
  • Carrots
  • Onions
  • Beets
  • Winter squashes (butternut, acorn, etc)
  • Sweet potatoes/yams
  • Turnips
  • Parsnips
  • Rutabagas
  • Red radishes
  • Daikon radishes
  • Green cabbage
  • Burdock

A simple way to cook these vegetables is to follow the recipe below that I call “Sweet Sensation.” It has few ingredients and preparation time is minimal.

Kim’s Sweet Sensation Recipe

  1. Use one, two, three, four or five of the sweet vegetables mentioned above.
  2. Chop the hardest ones, like carrots and beets, into smaller pieces.
  3. Softer vegetables, like onions and cabbage, can be cut into larger chunks.
  4. Use a medium-sized pot and add enough water to barely cover the vegetables. You may want to check the water level while cooking and add more water if needed. Remember, vegetables on the bottom will get cooked more than the ones on the top. Cook until desired softness. The softer the vegetables get, the sweeter they become.
  5. You may also add any of the following ingredients: spices, salt, seaweed. You can add a can of beans for extra protein.
  6. When the vegetables have cooked to your satisfaction, empty the ingredients into a large bowl, flavor as desired and eat. The leftover cooking water makes a delicious, sweet sauce, and is a healing, soothing tonic to drink by itself.

Other cooking methods include steaming, roasting, and stir-frying. They can also be simmered and puréed to create a soup, or you can simply eat them raw, grated in a salad. Be creative!

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Kim WilsonKim Wilson Pollock is a Certified Holistic Health & Wellness Consultant dedicated to helping busy individuals live a healthier lifestyle. She received her certification through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. Kim’s life changed in 2006 when her mother was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Her mom decided to fight her cancer through nutrition by changing her diet and eating real foods, juicing green vegetables and creating delicious green smoothies and Kim was quick to join her mom in this new lifestyle!  Visit her at [www.kimwilsonhealthcoach.com]. Follow Kim on Facebook and Twitter.

Get Healthy Co-op Style Day 10: 10 Amazing Health Benefits of Beets

January 15th, 2013

get healthy coop style badge2It’s day 10 of Get Healthy Co-op Style – the perfect day for UA member and health coach Kim Wilson to share 10 amazing health benefits of beets.  We ♥ our Texas beets here at Urban Acres!

Please follow along, join us, blog, tweet and Facebook about it and be sure to use hashtag  #GetHealthyCoopStyle.

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10 Amazing Health Benefits of Beets

by Kim Wilson, Health Coach

beets for saleDo you get excited when you see beets in your UA co-op style produce share? I do! Beets pack a powerful punch when it comes to your health! And although they might be a little messy to cook with (yes, they stain your hands a purple/red color temporarily), they are one of the most important vegetables you can eat!

Here’s why beets are so amazing:

  • Whole fresh organic beets offer two vegetables in one. The leaves are edible and tasty if steamed and topped with some organic butter, lemon or lime and your favorite spices. Those greens are similar to spinach in taste and texture and quite nutritious. Simply separate the beets from the leaves and store them until there are enough to steam. The separated beets can last for days in the fridge.   Get plenty of beet & beet greens recipes here.
  • Beets are rich in betaine, which stimulate the liver cell function and helps keep the bile ducts healthy and flowing which enables the body to eliminate toxins.
  • Beets also protect against heart disease because another benefit of betaine is its ability to reduce homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is the toxic amino acid that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Beets cleanse the colon and can relieve constipation.
  • Beets strengthen the gall bladder.
  • Beets help increase stamina (great for athletes, drink a beet juice after a big workout).
  • Beets can also assist in treating and curing boils, abscesses and even acne.
  • Beets contain folic acid, which is necessary for the production and maintenance of new cells. This is especially important for pregnant women or anyone undergoing physical healing.
  • Beets also contain sodium, magnesium, calcium, iron and phosphorous which are all nutrients that many Americans are deficient in.
  • Beets help cleanse the blood and create more red blood cells. They are useful for treating and curing anemia. Heavy daily beet consumption has even been used to treat leukemia and other cancers. With normal consumption, one can benefit from beets’ anti-carcinogenic properties.

Juicing beets will deliver all of these nutrients to your cells faster!  Here is a great recipe:

Beet Juice with Carrots and Celery

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 organic red beets
  • 2 large organic carrots
  • 1 stalk of organic celery

Directions:

  1. Wash the vegetables using water and a vegetable brush.
  2. Remove the carrot and beetroot tops. Peel the beets.
  3. Slice up the vegetables to fit your juicer.
  4. Juice and serve.

For a sweeter drink, add an apple, or use 2 apples instead of the carrots.

There are several ways to consume beets besides juicing them! The outer skins should always be peeled. Then they can be grated raw and sprinkled on salads or you can chop them up into quarters, steam them and prepare as you would any vegetable. YUM!  Get plenty of beet & beet greens recipes here.

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Kim WilsonKim Wilson Pollock is a Certified Holistic Health & Wellness Consultant dedicated to helping busy individuals live a healthier lifestyle. She received her certification through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition. Kim’s life changed in 2006 when her mother was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Her mom decided to fight her cancer through nutrition by changing her diet and eating real foods, juicing green vegetables and creating delicious green smoothies and Kim was quick to join her mom in this new lifestyle!  Visit her at [www.kimwilsonhealthcoach.com]. Follow Kim on Facebook and Twitter.

Holey Beet Greens

January 6th, 2013

holey beet greens

We’re already lovin’ our delicious beets from this Saturday’s co-op style produce share.  They’re local too – from Gundermann Acres in Wharton County, TX.  You might have noticed some holes in your beet greens, but please don’t throw them away!  You can eat the greens, and some holes in the greens is actually a good indication.

Why are there sometimes holes in organic produce?

A few holes in your produce (especially greens) are a very telltale sign that it’s organic.  It’s actually a good thing, because it means the produce is not sprayed with any chemicals to repel the pests.

For more info, read What’s With These Holes In My Kale?

So you might be asking, “Why aren’t there holes in organic produce at the grocery store?”

Most big grocery store chains – even those that sell a lot of organic produce – are concerned with a perfect “look” to the produce.  Several of our local organic farmers say they are not able to sell produce that isn’t perfect-looking to many of their big chain accounts.  Guess those cute local peaches with a “nose” won’t make the cut.  :)    The same goes for greens that have some bug holes.  But we’ll take ‘em!  We love the imperfect look of organic produce straight from the local farmer.  And we hope you do, too.

>> Get recipes for beets & beet greens!

Local Bounty Just In Time For The Holiday…

December 20th, 2012

Our farmers are harvesting – here are all the wonderful local produce items we’re  planning* for this weekend’s co-op style produce shares…there are a few more items in your share; this is just the local ones.  Have a wonderful holiday!

*Please remember that when working with fresh produce, availability can sometimes change last-minute.  We do our best to let you know what’s coming ahead of time, sometimes there are slight variations in the shares that we can’t predict at the time this is posted.  Thanks for your understanding!

Here are some recipe ideas for ya…

Chili Garlic Mustard Greens

mustard greens

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Most often found in Asian grocery stores, the Daikon radish looks like a large, white carrot, though it has the flavor of a radish. It is used as a food herb in Asian herbal medicine. Both the tuber and the seeds are used medicinally.

Its uses are many, treating such problems as cough and asthma, low energy, and yeast infections. Daikon also treats many digestive issues, including nausea, irritable bowel syndrome, indigestion, and heartburn.

Easy Daikon Salad

daikon salad

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Green Garlic Soup

greengarlic

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Kale, Mushroom, and Chickpea Stuffed Sweet Potatoes (try with regular potato!)

Image: afarmerinthedell.com
Photo credit: afarmerinthedell.com

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Creamy Kale Salad with Beets

Creamy Kale Salad | Image: wholeliving.com
Photo credit: wholeliving.com

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Arugula Salad with Beets and Goat Cheese

arugula-beet-salad

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The Pioneer Woman’s Roasted Carrots

Photo credit: thepioneerwoman.com
Photo credit: thepioneerwoman.com

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Beetza (uses beets and kale)

Photo: afarmerinthedell.com
Photo credit: afarmerinthedell.com

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Straight from the Texas valley, Texas Red Grapefruit are sweet, juicy and tree-ripened, literally stored on the tree to peak of perfection.  The Rio Star grapefruit combines the two reddest varieties – Rio Red and Star Ruby grapefruit. It has an overall blush on the exterior peel with a deep red interior color which is 7 to 10 times redder than the Ruby Red.

Spinach and Grapefruit Salad

riostargrapefruit

pinterest button Or get lots of recipe ideas on our Pinterest page!

Thank you for being a part of Urban Acres and supporting Texas farmers and local, organic produce!  We ♥ our farmers, and we ♥ you!

Ch-Ch-Chioggia

November 28th, 2012

We’re planning to include lovely Chioggia Beets in this weekend’s co-op style produce shares.  When you cut them open, you’ll find a little surprise:

Chioggia beets

Doesn’t that just make you happy?  Also known as the “candy cane beet” and the “bullseye beet”, the chioggia is an heirloom beet from Italy.

From TheKitchn.com

The chioggia beet came from the Italian coastal town of Chioggia, near Venice. It’s been around since the early 19th-century. It tastes just like regular purple beets, maybe a little sweeter. The skin is a hot pink/fuchsia color, and when sliced open, the inside has beautiful pink and white stripes. Like any other beet, it can be prepared the same way; steamed, sauteed, roasted, and pickled. The greens are also edible. Sadly, the beautiful stripes fade when the beet is cooked.

Try these chioggia beet recipes…

Try these other beet recipes…

Get lots of recipe ideas on our Pinterest page!

Fall Produce, How Do We Love Thee? Let Us Count the Ways…

October 10th, 2012

First honeycrisp apples of the season

We’re officially in love with the fall produce that’s beginning to come in.  In the next few weeks, the co-op style produce shares will have  LOCAL butternut squash, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, acorn squash, beets and several other exciting items!    Stay tuned.  In the meantime, please indulge us while we swoon over a few of our favorites…

1) Butternut Squash.  

Every drop of sweat that goes into peeling, seeding, and chopping a butternut squash is worth it in our book.  This is simply a delicious, buttery, versatile fall vegetable with tons of great recipe ideas.  Check this post and our Pinterest board for a few of our favorite butternut squash recipes.

2) Honeycrisp Apples.

BEST.APPLE.EVER.  Enough said.

If you simply must cook them, perhaps try apple and fennel soup or apple chips.

3) Sweet Potatoes.

Sweet potato chips…sweet potato fries…sweet potato hash…baked sweet potatoes…sweet potato soup…sweet potato chili…sweet potato brownies…we’re starting to sound like Bubba from Forrest Gump.  You get the idea.  Get recipes on our Pinterest board or try one of these…

4) Beets.

We’re on a mission to make every UA member a beet believer.   Don’t throw the greens away, either – you can eat them too!  There are lots of beet recipes on our Pinterest board, here on TheKitchn.com, or below…

Texas Fruit, Sorrel, and More!

June 7th, 2012

The Texas fruit is finally coming in, including those delicious blueberries & tomatoes!  Here’s what we’re planning* for this weekend’s almost 100% local co-op style produce shares

*When working with fresh produce, availability can sometimes change last-minute.  We do our best to let you know what’s coming ahead of time, but sometimes things do change, especially when working with local farmers.  Thanks for your understanding!

Here are some recipes for you…

Texas Blueberries

>> Make sure to read this post on how to keep your berries mold-free and lasting longer!

What Is Sorrel?

Sorrel is a delightful, leafy green with a tart, lemony flavor.  Use the tender, young leaves in salads, and the larger leaves for soups, stews and sauces. Sorrel also complements goat cheese, eggs and poultry.

Rich in vitamin C, sorrel was valued for centuries for its ability to prevent scurvy, a serious, even life-threatening problem when fresh fruits and vegetables were not available. The English physician Culpeper (1826) recommended sorrel “to cool any inflammation and heat of blood,” “to refresh overspent spirits,” “to quench thirst, and to procure an appetite.”  Pretty cool!

Get sorrel recipes here – both raw and cooked.

Beefsteak Tomatoes

Thank you for being a part of Urban Acres and supporting Texas farmers and local, organic produce!  We ♥ our farmers, and we ♥ you!